schemas

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You’re a front-end developer. You’re writing for a component template. You hand off HTML for a back-end developer to write a view. The back-end developer looks at it, goes cross-eyed and starts muttering to himself. You explain it. He says, “yeah, Tridion can’t do that.” You read my last post; you’d know that there’s a

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This is part three of a series called “Front-end for the Middle”. Honestly, I didn’t mean to write three posts. But when one post is over 2,000 words without being finished, it’s time to get slicing. Previously, we’ve talked about directing a front-end developer’s focus away from design, and on to content. And we’ve also

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This is a continuation of a previous post that I wrote, entitled Front-end for the Middle: Focus and Design. Previously, we established that it’s better for a front-end developer to be focused on content, rather than design. In this post, we’re going to move into a discussion on how HTML semantics can influence what happens

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Almost a year ago, I sent out a quick post that I’d created a Default Schemas for Tridion project on Github. ¬†Because I wrote that post on a Friday afternoon, I didn’t offer many details. But today’s Monday‚Ķ

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I’ve been working on a new Tridion implementation for a client, and for the last few days all I’ve been doing is making schemas. No, not content schemas. Embeddable schemas. Metadata schemas. Schemas that aren’t even necessarily specific to the client. Just things that are necessary to make bigger, more complex schemas. And then today