CMS

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You’re a front-end developer. You’re writing for a component template. You hand off HTML for a back-end developer to write a view. The back-end developer looks at it, goes cross-eyed and starts muttering to himself. You explain it. He says, “yeah, Tridion can’t do that.” You read my last post; you’d know that there’s a

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So, you’re a front-end developer, eh? And you’ve been told that you’ll be writing code, and that it’ll be moved into a Content Management System. Called Tridion. And you can’t find out where to download it because there’s not a version on Github. There’s some random blogs out there, a Stack Exchange, but it all

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In a previous post, I talked about some general better practices for writing jQuery plugins that will play nicely in content management systems. Today, I’d like to introduce one such plugin: flexModal.

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Not too long ago, I worked with Alex Klock on creating a Tridion GUI extension for a client. The GUI extension was for a document embedding service provided by Crocodoc1.  Once I finished, I had to provide a training document for it. Soon after, the client wanted documentation on some other things. And then more

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Working in Content Management System (CMS) implementations has its challenges. While some of those challenges are in the application itself, many can be with the content authors. Content authors expect a certain amount of flexibility in how they can add or remove content on a page and we have to find a way to account

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One of the biggest problems that I’ve found working in the web industry is that outsiders don’t really get what a corporate website is all about. It’s not just about HTML, a really good design, or content. I’m finding that too many young businesses, or immature older ones, think one web designer is all it takes to put together a website. So I’m going to attempt to describe in under 1,000 words what should go into a website. The key word here is should.