Tridion

by

There’s a growing trend of ditching traditional “back-end” frameworks for dynamically rendering pages. As the interest in client-side frameworks grows, so does confusion about which one to use. There’s React! But then there’s Angular…and have you heard about Vue? What about Handlebars? But let’s back up a second. Should you even use one at all?

by

It came to my shock and surprise to learn in January that I’d been awarded a fourth SDL Tridion Web Tridion MVP award. In the previous year, I hadn’t felt as if my contributions were that great —but contribution is not in the eye of the beholder. One of the perks of winning an MVP

by

It’s not that hard to write CSS. The basics of how the language works can be learned in 15 minutes. Most of the major properties and techniques for using them can be learned in a few days.  You can learn how to build static websites within a few weeks —and there’s scores of books and blogs

by

So you’re a back-end developer. You write .net or Java all day. You create Schemas and Templates in Tridion. It’s Friday. The front-end developers have signed off early and you just got a high priority bug. And it’s in the CSS. You hate CSS. What do you do?

by

Front-end developers have enough on their plates. Between the latest CSS modules, the “HTML5” APIs, JavaScript updates, and new frameworks (Angular 2, React), it’s hard enough to keep up. And if that isn’t enough, then there’s the content management systems: Drupal, Joomla, WordPress, Sitecore, Adobe, Teamsite, and Tridion. As I’ve mentioned before, Tridion isn’t open-source.

by

You’re a front-end developer. You’re writing for a component template. You hand off HTML for a back-end developer to write a view. The back-end developer looks at it, goes cross-eyed and starts muttering to himself. You explain it. He says, “yeah, Tridion can’t do that.” You read my last post; you’d know that there’s a

by

So, you’re a front-end developer, eh? And you’ve been told that you’ll be writing code, and that it’ll be moved into a Content Management System. Called Tridion. And you can’t find out where to download it because there’s not a version on Github. There’s some random blogs out there, a Stack Exchange, but it all

by

This is part three of a series called “Front-end for the Middle”. Honestly, I didn’t mean to write three posts. But when one post is over 2,000 words without being finished, it’s time to get slicing. Previously, we’ve talked about directing a front-end developer’s focus away from design, and on to content. And we’ve also

by

This is a continuation of a previous post that I wrote, entitled Front-end for the Middle: Focus and Design. Previously, we established that it’s better for a front-end developer to be focused on content, rather than design. In this post, we’re going to move into a discussion on how HTML semantics can influence what happens