Web

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So in a follow-up to my post on layering the feedback with CSS, I’ve created a simple starting point with styling our forms: a form feedback boiler plate.

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Feedback Matters Long gone are the days where all we did was stare at a website and absorb content. We fill out contact forms, buy stuff, hold chat sessions, Tweet this and unlike that. These website interactions become more complex as they slowly get better at mirroring real-world interactions. One of the steps in mirroring

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One of my new favorite features of HTML5 is the wicked awesome storage options. One of the first cool things I thought was to come up with a way to protect a user’s form information. Let’s pretend you been filling out that credit application or Kitty Wig order form and a bald eagle drops a

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I’ve really been interested recently in figuring out how to use HTML5 to create graphs and visualized data. I haven’t quite figured it out, but in the course of things, I stumbled upon the meter element and the range input. So whether we want to show whether we’ve reached the necessary signatures on our petition

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support rapid updating of content, changes in Search Engine Marketing, and syndication of content. One of the core indicators of a well-architected CMS, in fact, is the separation of Design, Content, and Information Architecture. Put another way, the layout of a page is independent of the content on it, which is independent of the organization of pages. While there is much focus on getting the CMS to support the content strategies of now and the future, next to none goes into supporting the Brand strategies of the future.

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After a project was laid on me in the eleventh hour which had to be delivered in the twelfth, I found myself madly trying to educate myself on a foreign subject. The project and the subject doesn’t really matter. What mattered to me was collecting enough data for me to deliver it on time. Google performed beautifully; but a lot of the sites failed. Why? Pop-ups.

Of course, they aren’t the pop-ups of years past, they’re “modal windows” or “lightboxes”. You’ve all seen them. You visit a page, the background fades to grey, and a simple little window automagically springs into existence. Sometimes they asked me to register. Sometimes it was a sales pitch. The reason didn’t matter. I was there to get content. And now you’ve covered it up and forced me to click on something to get to it.

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One of the biggest problems that I’ve found working in the web industry is that outsiders don’t really get what a corporate website is all about. It’s not just about HTML, a really good design, or content. I’m finding that too many young businesses, or immature older ones, think one web designer is all it takes to put together a website. So I’m going to attempt to describe in under 1,000 words what should go into a website. The key word here is should.

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I’m beginning the first in a series of posts call the CMS diaries. I’m a contractor for a very large and reputable organization which is launching a new website very soon.I was brought in specifically to serve as the business analyst for the web content management system. As exciting as that might sound, it isn’t. In the wonderful, wide, world of the web – the CMS is the dullest part. The guy who does your CMS is the accountant for Greenday. There’s no chance of being hip, cool, or creative. At best, he can say that he’s the reason American Idiot was 99 cents a song. Regardless, I will sexify the incredibly boring and forgotten part of your web redesign: The Web Content Management System.