Design and UI

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In the last year or so, “Responsive Design” has become quite the buzzword. It’s not just industry jargon or a little article on A List Apart anymore. Project managers, business analysts, salesmen and marketing executives are tossing around the term “Responsive Design”. Heck, a year ago I was explaining the concept to an executive, and

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For the past few months I’ve been developing three different web-based tools.  All three are things that I started as tools for me, and it was after talking to other folks that I learned they might ultimately be useful for them, too. When my user base shifted from just me to a whole lot of

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Any of my web development buddies have learned that I’m a huge fan of the em. Huge fan. We’d be Facebook friends, we’d go on vacation together, yadda yadda yadda. When you look at my online resume you’ll be hard-up to find too many px written into my stylesheet. In fact, almost every property with

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I’m in a CSS mailing list and this morning, Vince over at Ghodmode Development shared a fun little experiment showing that an em isn’t an “m” in CSS. I, along with others, more or less responded with “d’uh”. We’ve seen this phenomenon for years and didn’t totally understand the purpose. In fact, I attempted to

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So in a follow-up to my post on layering the feedback with CSS, I’ve created a simple starting point with styling our forms: a form feedback boiler plate.

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Feedback Matters Long gone are the days where all we did was stare at a website and absorb content. We fill out contact forms, buy stuff, hold chat sessions, Tweet this and unlike that. These website interactions become more complex as they slowly get better at mirroring real-world interactions. One of the steps in mirroring

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support rapid updating of content, changes in Search Engine Marketing, and syndication of content. One of the core indicators of a well-architected CMS, in fact, is the separation of Design, Content, and Information Architecture. Put another way, the layout of a page is independent of the content on it, which is independent of the organization of pages. While there is much focus on getting the CMS to support the content strategies of now and the future, next to none goes into supporting the Brand strategies of the future.

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After a project was laid on me in the eleventh hour which had to be delivered in the twelfth, I found myself madly trying to educate myself on a foreign subject. The project and the subject doesn’t really matter. What mattered to me was collecting enough data for me to deliver it on time. Google performed beautifully; but a lot of the sites failed. Why? Pop-ups.

Of course, they aren’t the pop-ups of years past, they’re “modal windows” or “lightboxes”. You’ve all seen them. You visit a page, the background fades to grey, and a simple little window automagically springs into existence. Sometimes they asked me to register. Sometimes it was a sales pitch. The reason didn’t matter. I was there to get content. And now you’ve covered it up and forced me to click on something to get to it.