Tridion

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It’s that time of year again; the time of the year when the year ends. Sure, I could reflect on it, like I did for 2014.  But, ehh, I’ve done that in years-passed. This time, I’d like to rate it. You know, like a review. Like an Amazon review or something. And I like writing

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We’ve all been there. It’s  2:00 in the afternoon. You need to pick up your kids from school. But, when you look at a component in Tridion’s Experience Manager (XPM / Site Edit), it’s broken. WTF! You’re not a front-end guy. You’re an architect. What do you do?

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The world of front-end development is changing at a lightning fast pace. It’s hard enough for a front-end developer to keep up. So, how should a Tridion architect or general back-end developer stay “in the know” about the world of front-end development? Let me share with you what I’ve been doing in 2016 that I

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Front-end developers have enough on their plates. Between the latest CSS modules, the “HTML5” APIs, JavaScript updates, and new frameworks (Angular 2, React), it’s hard enough to keep up. And if that isn’t enough, then there’s the content management systems: Drupal, Joomla, WordPress, Sitecore, Adobe, Teamsite, and Tridion. As I’ve mentioned before, Tridion isn’t open-source.

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So, you’re a front-end developer. You’re trying to learn about Tridion and how it affects your life. Maybe you’ve met some Tridion architects you want to impress. Maybe you’ve aggravated them, but you’ve run out of whisky. Even after my last post on schemas, you still feel like there’s more to learn. Well, you’re right.

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You’re a front-end developer. You’re writing for a component template. You hand off HTML for a back-end developer to write a view. The back-end developer looks at it, goes cross-eyed and starts muttering to himself. You explain it. He says, “yeah, Tridion can’t do that.” You read my last post; you’d know that there’s a

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So, you’re a front-end developer, eh? And you’ve been told that you’ll be writing code, and that it’ll be moved into a Content Management System. Called Tridion. And you can’t find out where to download it because there’s not a version on Github. There’s some random blogs out there, a Stack Exchange, but it all

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This is part three of a series called “Front-end for the Middle”. Honestly, I didn’t mean to write three posts. But when one post is over 2,000 words without being finished, it’s time to get slicing. Previously, we’ve talked about directing a front-end developer’s focus away from design, and on to content. And we’ve also