Web Development

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If there’s something in the HTML5 technology suite whose potential is inversely proportionate to its simplicity, it’s geolocation. The API is very simple and the opportunities haven’t begun to get tapped. My boss over at Tahzoo has a few mind-blowing ideas and he asked me to research the API and prepare a demo to see

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I’m in a CSS mailing list and this morning, Vince over at Ghodmode Development shared a fun little experiment showing that an em isn’t an “m” in CSS. I, along with others, more or less responded with “d’uh”. We’ve seen this phenomenon for years and didn’t totally understand the purpose. In fact, I attempted to

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My absolute favorite HTML5 attribute is “contenteditable”. It makes the contents of the element editable. It’s an incredibly simple feature that has tons of potential for your website.In fact, I’ve already seen it paired with localStorage or Web SQL APIs to capture data and create browser-side interactivity.

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So in a follow-up to my post on layering the feedback with CSS, I’ve created a simple starting point with styling our forms: a form feedback boiler plate.

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Feedback Matters Long gone are the days where all we did was stare at a website and absorb content. We fill out contact forms, buy stuff, hold chat sessions, Tweet this and unlike that. These website interactions become more complex as they slowly get better at mirroring real-world interactions. One of the steps in mirroring

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One of my new favorite features of HTML5 is the wicked awesome storage options. One of the first cool things I thought was to come up with a way to protect a user’s form information. Let’s pretend you been filling out that credit application or Kitty Wig order form and a bald eagle drops a

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I’ve really been interested recently in figuring out how to use HTML5 to create graphs and visualized data. I haven’t quite figured it out, but in the course of things, I stumbled upon the meter element and the range input. So whether we want to show whether we’ve reached the necessary signatures on our petition

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Believe it or not, the first person to teach me how to write a program was my mother. Our first computer was a Commodore 64 – and she was a pro at that thing. She has a bachelor’s in English and a Master’s in Reading; not who you’d expect to master BASIC in the early 80’s. In the days before the internet, she did some old-fashioned research, tracked down some books, and experimented a lot with programming until she was ready to teach it in a classroom a few years later. She wrote math programs for me, and she even taught me how to program by giving me the same rules she shared with her classroom, which I’ll share with you.