Some Guiding Principles For Front-End Development

I’ve recently had a bout of philosophy that I can’t quite shake. I like philosophy a lot, and I think we’re all philosophers. I think I picked up that idea in my Ayn Rand phase, where she said,

As a human being, you have no choice about the fact that you need a philosophy. Your only choice is whether you define a philosophy by a subconsious… thought

What I’ve realized is that I have had some subconscious thoughts about Front-end Development. And once I really bring them to the foreground, I realize that there are some core principles that guide why I do what I do, and how I choose to do it. So, I’d like to share some of my philosophies of front-end development. Read More

Front-end Best Practices for Tridion’s Experience Manager

Tridion’s Experience Manager (XPM) has been a hot topic at Tahzoo recently. Piti Itharat, Shawn Webber, and I have all been talking about some of the “gotchas” we’ve experienced in the front-end of XPM implementations. Especially after a few front-end folks started asking for tips on how to be XPM-minded when writing HTML and CSS, the three of us put together a short list of best-practices and pitfalls for doing the front-end in XPM.

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A Tiny Tool for HTML5’s localStorage and sessionStorage

I was talking to a colleague recently about the release of McSandy, and he mentioned that he had a project coming up that would require manipulation of HTML5’s LocalStorage API. I pointed him to a small gist that I’d put up on Github. And then I thought, “hey, maybe I should mention this to other folks, too.”

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Four Features of McSandy you might appreciate

After I announced that McSandy was in beta mode, I created a Reddit post for McSandy, and asked for feedback. What I noticed is that a lot of folks don’t really get why I made McSandy — because there’s tons of other options out there. So I’m going to show you why, with a few lovely animated gifs.

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Introducing McSandy: An Offline Code Editor

About two and a half years ago, I lived in Colorado, and had to fly out to Columbus Ohio pretty regularly. On one such flight, I wanted to test out some CSS and HTML. But I didn’t have any Wifi on the plane.  When you don’t have internet, and you want to do a quick code-and-preview, it can be  annoying when you have to fire up a local server and set up your files. I figured that there should be a code editor that could work regardless of whether you had an internet connection.

So I made one. Read More

Grunt.js: Minify, rename, and put it in another folder

Grunt Logo copyrighted, all rights reserved by Bocoup

Grunt Logo copyrighted, all rights reserved by Bocoup


If you know Grunt.js, this post is for you. Grunt is a super awesome node.js-based task runner. It makes development easier, your productivity faster, and your attractiveness… attractiver.

I don’t want to go through all 3,000+ reasons that Grunt is fantastic, so I’ll just give you one: You’re writing some JavaScript files. You’d like them to be minified, renamed, and placed in another directory… Every time you save a file. But, the Uglify task doesn’t do that!

Oh, but it does…

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Front-end Architecture Options in Tridion

I had a discussion recently about whether to put CSS into Tridion as multimedia components or code components, and it triggered a really fun discussion. We talked about all of our different strategies and use-cases for managing the CSS in SDL Tridion, and it seems like something that other folks may ask about in the future. So what I’d like to do here is summarize my thoughts and experiences on front-end architecture, and what implementation options you have in Tridion.
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Two Front-end Tidbits for Tridion Guys

As I’ve mentioned previously, I recently left Tahzoo and started working at a new company called Content Bloom. Last week was Content Bloom’s global training summit, held in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada (if that’s a real place). Everyone at the company presented on a topic; it’s a chance for us to all teach each other. I was nominated to speak on Front-end, but with only a 30-minute window, I had to be very focused on what I was going to teach on. Very focused. So I picked only two topics— and I only went over by an hour.
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